Tool

Making WCF service request using Postman

Tools

You don’t need another WCF client to test WCF services if you already have fantastic Postman installed on your machine. But requesting WCF service using Postman needs little more than just providing a Service Url and a Xml body to the SOAP request. One issue developers always stumble upon first time when using Postman to call a Wcf service is this cryptic error message: The message with Action '' cannot be processed at the receiver, due to a ContractFilter mismatch at the EndpointDispatcher..

Following is an example ActionNotSupported fault response raised by the Wcf Service:

 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9101112131415
<s:Envelope xmlns:s="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/">
  <s:Body>
  <s:Fault>
    <faultcode xmlns:a="http://schemas.microsoft.com/ws/2005/05/addressing/none">
      a:ActionNotSupported
    </faultcode>
    <faultstring xml:lang="en-US">
      The message with Action '' cannot be processed at the receiver, due to a ContractFilter mismatch at the
      EndpointDispatcher. This may be because of either a contract mismatch (mismatched Actions between sender and
      receiver) or a binding/security mismatch between the sender and the receiver. Check that sender and receiver
      have the same contract and the same binding (including security requirements, e.g. Message, Transport, None).
    </faultstring>
  </s:Fault>
  </s:Body>
</s:Envelope>
ActionNotSupported Soap Fault Code raised by Wcf Service

Inspecting the exception fault string more carefully, you will surely realize that the exception has something to do with Action “. Postman is apparently not sending any Action contract with the SOAP request, and Wcf service is treating it as empty Action. With the empty received Action, service trying to match it with its own Action contract which result as mismatch. And this is what is causing the exception.

To resolve the issue, you need to explicitly provide a SOAPAction to the header with your SOAP request to the service. You can get the SOAPAction of the web method from the WSDL document of your Wcf service. Just navigate to the WSDL Uri, which usually your Wcf service Url appended with “?wsdl”, and look for soap:operation node of the web method you want to call. Copy the value of soapAction attribute which will be something like http://tempuri.org/I<Your Service Name>/<Method Name> and use this value as SOAPAction of your service call.

Get the SOAPAction value from WSDL document of your Wcf Service

Adding SOAPAction header in Postman is simple. You have to goto Headers tab of the Postman for the Wcf service, add a New key, provide Key as “SOAPAction” and the Value whatever you copied in above step.

Configure SOAPAction

With the SOAPAction configured for your Wcf service, hit Send button in Postman to make service call and voila! You should receive proper SOAP response from the service. Save the Service request in the Postman so that you don’t have to do the same SOAPAction configuration again for the service.

Wcf service call using Postman

My automatized workflow to setup Postman to call Wcf service is following:

  1. Make GET call of the service Url with appended “?wsdl”.
  2. Copy the value of soapAction attribute of your SOAP method.
  3. Change Http method to POST and remove “?wsdl”
  4. Provide header with key “SOAPAction” and value copied soapAction attribute.
  5. Set “Content-Type” header as “text/xml”
  6. Provide SOAP Envelop in Body
  7. Hit Send (and Save for the future task).

Tags: soap, tool, postman

You don’t need another WCF client to test WCF services if you already have fantastic Postman installed on your machine. But requesting WCF service using Postman needs little more than just providing a Service Url and a Xml body to the SOAP request. One issue developers always stumble upon first time when using Postman to call a Wcf service is this cryptic error message: The message with Action '' cannot be processed at the receiver, due to a ContractFilter mismatch at the EndpointDispatcher.
Read More…

How to go back to previous directory in DOS command prompt?

Tools

If you shuffle a lot between Linux/Mac and Windows OS, you surely miss many Linux shell commands in Windows Command Prompt and you definitely wish if you can replicate or have some kind of workaround of those commands in Windows to make life bit easier. One of those commands is navigating back to the previous directory. In Linux, you can just type: cd - and voila, you go back to your previous directory. No need to check paths of previously entered directories. That’s one handy command. As usually happen with most productive shell commands, there is no equivalent command parameter in DOS.

I was looking for some kind of workaround to achieve same in DOS but when I couldn’t find any solution online so I decided to devise and build my own solution. It started with a very basic DOS batch file which just simulates Linux cd – command but slowly and gradually it grows over the period of time as I added more and more features.

So how does it work? To implement this solution, you will need two batch files: ccd.bat and dos_init.cmd. ccd.bat will have actual batch commands which take care of redirecting command to appropriate branch and keeping the history of visited directories whereas dos_init.cmd will create DOSKEY aliases for cd command. You should create both files in one of your PATH directories (for example C:\Windows) so that DOS will able to locate these in Command Windows.

 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 910111213141516171819202122232425262728293031323334353637383940414243444546474849505152
@echo off
if '%*'=='' goto show_current_directory
if '%*'=='~' goto home_directory
if '%*'=='-d' goto my_documents_directory
if '%*'=='-p' goto program_files_directory
if '%*'=='-w' goto windows_directory
if '%*'=='--' goto previous_directory
if '%*'=='-' goto toggle_directory
goto change_directory

:show_current_directory
    cd
    goto batch_end

:home_directory
    call:GotoDirectory %HOMEPATH%
    goto batch_end

:my_documents_directory
    call:GotoDirectory %HOMEPATH%\Documents
    goto batch_end

:program_files_directory
    call:GotoDirectory "%PROGRAMFILES%"
    goto batch_end

:windows_directory
    call:GotoDirectory %WINDIR%
    goto batch_end

:previous_directory
    set current_dir=%cd%
    popd
    goto batch_end

:toggle_directory
    set current_dir=%cd%
    cd %previous_dir%
    set previous_dir=%current_dir%
    goto batch_end

:change_directory
    call:GotoDirectory %*
    goto batch_end

:GotoDirectory
    pushd .
    set previous_dir=%cd%
    cd %~1
    goto:eof

:batch_end

123456
@echo off
doskey cd=ccd $*
doskey cd..=ccd ..
doskey cd--=ccd --
doskey cd-=ccd -
doskey cd\=ccd

You always require running dos_init.cmd before using ccd.bat so that assign aliases are available for ccd batch file. To automate that, you can simply add an entry in Windows Registry which will automatically run dos_init.cmd command every time you open Command Windows.

12
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Command Processor]
AutoRun=C:\Windows\dos_init.cmd

Following are steps to create above Registry entry. Be careful when editing the registry and make sure you know what you’re doing.

  1. Open Windows Registry.
  2. Go to registry path: [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Command Processor]
  3. Create a registry entry with key as “AutoRun” and value as complete path of your dos_init.cmd

And that’s all we need.

Let’s go through the usage of this batch file:

Type cd- to toggle between last and current directory.
Type cd-- to go back to previous directories.
Few more examples to changing directory to system folders using this solution.

I hope you will find this hack useful. So how you want to further enhance this batch file? Please do share your changes and improvements here so that others can also benefit.

Tags: dos, utility, tool, window

If you shuffle a lot between Linux/Mac and Windows OS, you surely miss many Linux shell commands in Windows Command Prompt and you definitely wish if you can replicate or have some kind of workaround of those commands in Windows to make life bit easier. One of those commands is navigating back to the previous directory. In Linux, you can just type: cd - and voila, you go back to your previous directory.
Read More…

Snippet Compiler

.NET

Here is a useful .NET utility tool if you just want to do quick test your code and without requiring to launch VS.NET and creating a new project setup.

Snippet Compiler

Snippet Compiler

Link:
Snippet Compiler

Download:
2.0.8.3 for .NET 2.0 | 2.0.7.1 for .NET 1.1

  • It minimize to the system tray of task bar.
  • It can also builds WinForm EXEs, console EXEs or DLLs.
  • You can compile multiple C#, VB.NET ASP.NET code.
  • It can be used to store templates library as well.
  • IntelliSense for static members and method
  • You can also export your snippet in HTML format which can be post in your blog.

Tags: .net, c#, tool

Here is a useful .NET utility tool if you just want to do quick test your code and without requiring to launch VS.NET and creating a new project setup. Snippet Compiler Link: Snippet Compiler Download: 2.0.8.3 for .NET 2.0 | 2.0.7.1 for .NET 1.1 It minimize to the system tray of task bar. It can also builds WinForm EXEs, console EXEs or DLLs. You can compile multiple C#, VB.
Read More…

Automating Your Builds With NAnt

.NET

NAnt is a powerful scripting tool designed for developers, software process engineers, and build specialists to create an automated, repeatable process for building their developed application. NAnt provides powerful XML-based scripting and some really cool features, as Jean-Paul Boodhoo explains in his series of post “Automating Your Builds With NAnt”, which can streamline your development and unit testing effort dramatically.

Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 1
Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 2
Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 3
Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 4
Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 5
Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 6
Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 7

Tags: .net, c#, tool

NAnt is a powerful scripting tool designed for developers, software process engineers, and build specialists to create an automated, repeatable process for building their developed application. NAnt provides powerful XML-based scripting and some really cool features, as Jean-Paul Boodhoo explains in his series of post “Automating Your Builds With NAnt”, which can streamline your development and unit testing effort dramatically. Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 1 Automating Your Builds With NAnt – Part 2
Read More…

Pasting plain text from clipboard

Utilities

You will love this nice little utility tool! When you copy the text from a web page or word document, Windows keeps the formatting as well with the text. Paste that text into any word processor and you end up with unwanted formatting as well with the pasted text. Well, this tool will simply remove those unwanted formatting and paste clean text instead from the clipboard. Isn’t it nice!

PureText

PureText

Link:
PureText 2.0

Tags: utlity, tool

You will love this nice little utility tool! When you copy the text from a web page or word document, Windows keeps the formatting as well with the text. Paste that text into any word processor and you end up with unwanted formatting as well with the pasted text. Well, this tool will simply remove those unwanted formatting and paste clean text instead from the clipboard. Isn’t it nice! PureText Link:
Read More…